Creating Meaningful, Satisfying Lives One Person at a Time

FULL COURSE LISTING​


COVID-19 PANDEMIC
PREPPING FOR LIFE AFTER THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC


Each 60-minute webinar presentation is designed to offer providers a roadmap to achieving a successful transition to the next incarnation of long-term care. Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, much has changed both in facilities and in the community at-large. Consumer confidence in nursing homes has deteriorated, with families opting for alternatives to residential care.

With an uncertain future, how facilities move through the coming months will be vital to surviving what is sure to be a difficult and challenging time. Despite progress toward improved vaccination rates, long-term care environments will continue to look and feel different for some time to come.

The following sessions encompass the vital aspects of recovery. Looking not only at compliance, but at rebuilding the confidence of consumers and health care workers in the ability of the facility to maintain a safe and satisfying environment. Moving forward, facility demographics are likely to change, causing the expectation for cultural competence and trauma-informed care to be a necessary focus for service and staff development.

1. Healing and Recovery – Role of leaders in crafting a new facility culture

The COVID-19 Pandemic has significantly limited a facility’s ability to achieve the long-standing industry ideal of creating a homelike environment of care. In the coming months, the facility culture and the quality of life for all concerned will be shaped by the status of the virus. The manner in which the leaders design and communicate the development of a new world order will be vital to a successful transition to the next generation of long-term care.


2. Quality Assurance – Compliance and Staff Development
Utilizing the Quality Assurance Performance Improvement (QAPI) process proactively is the most efficient way to achieve and maintain quality standards across all disciplines and care practices. Adopting an ongoing system of checks and balances of all major systems will minimize the potential for negative events, streamlining the facility’s ability to focus on distinct areas in need of development.


3. Rebuilding Consumer Confidence – Strategies for Improving Consumer Relations
The general public has never had a positive view of long-term care. The COVID-19 Pandemic has intensified the negative public perceptions and stimulated an increase in the demand for alternatives to long-term placement. Winning consumer confidence requires more than a focus on amenities. Building trust requires a confident, consistent, coordinated team approach to customer care and service.


4. Sex, Drugs, and Rolling Walkers – Accommodating a Changing Demographic
As the long-term care industry weathers the COVID-19 Pandemic, a shift in demographics to a more complex population has added another layer of stress for many facilities.  Resources to develop the type of care and service needed to address issues of mental health and substance abuse disorders and other behavioral health needs are in short supply. This session offers a variety of ideas for anticipating and developing common sense approaches to these contemporary challenges.


5. Quality of Life – Socialization and Productivity
Once the COVID-19 Pandemic has been successfully addressed through vaccinations and continued diligence in infection control, facilities will begin to return to a more traditional routine of programs and services. The pandemic has offered an opportunity to reevaluate the importance of socialization and productivity in the process of healing and recovery. More than busy work or entertainment, person-centered, therapeutic engagement should be an integral part of the plan of care.


6. Behavioral Health – Addressing Trauma, Grief and Depression

The restrictions imposed on visitation and social activities due to the COVID-19 Pandemic have caused a spike in reports of depression, anxiety, and suicidal thinking in many environments. Residents, their families, and your staff have all been working through the emotions brought on by stress, isolation, and fear. Responding to the behavioral health needs resulting from the pandemic requires that all staff understand the basic responsibility to provide culturally competent, trauma-informed care.


7. The COVID-19 Pandemic: Considerations in Dementia Care
The restrictions imposed on visitation and social activities due to the COVID-19 Pandemic have impacted the cognitive health and psychosocial well-being of all residents, but more significantly for those with dementia. Creating an environment of care that supports optimum health requires a well-trained staff with the knowledge and skills to accommodate the behavioral challenges associated with a diagnosis of dementia. This session offers guidance in developing and sustaining an improved quality of care and quality of life for residents challenged by dementia.


8. Care Planning in The Age of COVID-19
The COVID-19 Pandemic has challenged all long-term care facilities to make modifications to their day-to-day routines in ways that significantly influence the facility culture. The moratorium on visitation, social distancing and cancellation of group activities have all impacted the psychosocial well-being of residents and their caregivers. Addressing behavioral health needs proactively across a broad spectrum will be important to preserving the quality of care and quality of life during this crisis.  This discussion focuses on ensuring care plans are person-centered and keep pace with the challenges of the pandemic in a realistic and meaningful way.


9. COVID-19 Pandemic: Social Workers: Advocate, Educator, Lifeline
This session offers a comprehensive review of the many regulatory changes impacting the provision of medically related social services and strategies for planning and implementation of efficient, compliance care practices. The many COVID-related changes impacting the provision of medically-related social services and strategies for planning and implementation of efficient, compliant care practices is a focus of this conversation.


TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE and BEHAVIORAL HEALTH


1. Trauma-Informed Care: Quality Assurance and Abuse Prevention
This session outlines the development of an effective Quality Assurance system designed to monitor the policies and practices that ensure a well-trained, culturally competent staff who possess the knowledge and skill sets to care for a diverse and complicated resident population. The potential for episodes of abuse and neglect when staff education, training and oversight are insufficient is a focus of this conversation. 


2. Trauma-Informed Care: Achieving Compliance in Behavioral Health
Phase Three of the revised Federal regulations for Trauma-Informed Care and Behavioral Health Services challenge long-term care facilities to ensure that they are fully prepared to care for residents with complex psychosocial needs. Beyond differentiating between dementia and psychiatric illness or addictions, the facility staff must have a working knowledge of the interventions and services necessary to achieve quality care for a rapidly changing population.  This session offers an overview of the regulatory expectations and insight into applying the elements of trauma-informed care to the current COVID-19 Pandemic and its impact of resident and staff psychosocial well-being.

3. Improving the Care of Residents with Dementia

This education and training program is designed to offer members of the interdisciplinary team a comprehensive understanding of the expectations of both regulators and consumers with regard to creating a meaningful existence for the customers they serve. The rising numbers of residents impacted by dementia or a related cognitive deficit will intensify the challenges in addressing mood and behavior. Guidance in assessment and development of therapeutic activity and enhanced environments will be provided in this session.  The impact of meaningful activity and quality living on mood and behavior will be discussed at length.


4. Toward Better Behavior:  Yours, Mine and Everyone Else’s

As the long-term care demographics continue to shift and diversify, the greater the need to understand people as individuals. Achieving such understanding presents new challenges and considerations in assessment and care planning. While long-term care facilities once cared almost exclusively for the frail elderly, many of whom had also been diagnosed with dementia, today’s populations are far more varied in age, disability, and psychosocial circumstances. That makes understanding “what makes someone tick” more complicated, at best. This session provides professional caregivers a framework for developing an assessment process that results in a deeper understanding of what motivates someone to do what they do. With greater understanding comes a more focused, personalized plan to accommodate the complicated needs of every individual.


5. Sexuality, Capacity and Dementia
This session provides a shared human and clinical perspective on how to approach matters of sexuality for all residents, but with focused considerations for those with dementia or other special needs.  The matters of consent, capacity and resident education will be addressed.  Suggested approaches will be offered for care planning for issues involving suspected sexual abuse, cases of unwanted sexual contact or contact in circumstances where one or both parties lack capacity to consent.


6. Behavioral Health: The Changing Role of Therapeutic Activity
Traditional activity programming often fails to meet the behavioral health needs of the growing numbers of residents with dementia, mental disorders, substance use, and intellectual/developmental disabilities. Therapeutic activity should be person-centered, productive, and designed to serve as a realistic foundation for recovery and improvement. This session offers guidance in developing new pathways to improved coordination and teamwork in the provision of therapeutic activity for an increasingly diverse population.


7. Behavioral Health: Caring for A New Generation
This session explores the responsibilities and expectations for improvements in Behavioral Health and the person-centered interventions developed for residents with dementia, mental illness, substance abuse, and complicated psychosocial needs.  Staff must have sufficient knowledge, skill, and competency in addressing behavioral health needs.  This discussion will include a review of the new Federal regulations in areas relative to Residents’ Rights and Behavioral Health.  The facility’s responsibility to conduct an annual assessment of the population’s needs and the obligation to make ensure appropriate care and services are provided is a central theme of this presentation.  The importance of improved assessment and care planning practices to ensure the medical and psychosocial needs of a rapidly changing population are met is a focus of this discussion.


8. The Many Faces of Grief

The social distancing restrictions imposed as a result of the COVID-19 Pandemic has caused a variety of emotions in people worldwide. Some are angry, some are sad, some are denying, others are fearful, and still others just don’t understand. This session is designed to offer an opportunity to explore the thoughts and feelings many people are experiencing during this public health crisis. Recognizing how grief is influencing the mood and behavior of yourself and others in your community and how to work together to develop a culture of healing and support is the focus of this discussion.


9. Providing Mental Health Services for ID/DD Adults in Long Term Care
As the numbers of adult residents impacted by intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) continue to increase in long term care, ensuring staff possess the competency and skill sets to address mental health will take on a new significance. Maintaining a caregiving environment that supports positive psychosocial functioning requires that staff understand how ID/DD differs from dementia and other cognitive or mental disorders to ensure appropriate care and services are provided.  This session offers a framework for developing an assessment and person-centered approach to care planning that will prove successful for this emerging population of younger, more complicated adults.


10. Caring for A New Generation in Adult Day Health Care
As the ADHC consumer shifts to a more complex, younger, psychosocially challenged individual, creating a social environment in which everyone’s needs are satisfied is increasingly difficult. This session offers a fresh perspective on assessing the populations to be served and developing a new social order in which registrants of varied ages, disabilities and circumstances will thrive in a shared environment.  Accommodating the clinical needs and idiosyncrasies of a diverse population requires a creative, flexible routine that offers opportunities for productivity and positive social interactions.  Development of a positive, therapeutic program structure is a focus of this conversation. Discussion will include the development of care relationships with community and contract providers, families, and other involved caregivers to ensure a broad range of services are available to meet the medical and psychosocial needs of a rapidly changing resident population


11. Why Is Grandma Screaming? Improving Quality of Life in Long Term Care
This session opens a provocative conversation on the impact of the changing demographics in long term care on quality of life for those being served.  Access to mental health facilities, homeless shelters and other public or residential services for people of all ages with mental illness, substance abuse issues, complicated social circumstances and other complex needs has dwindled in a wounded economy.  The nursing home environment is fast becoming an uncomfortable mix of ages, circumstances, and medical and psychiatric needs. This session explores how to come together as a well-oiled machine to develop and sustain the kind of “livable environment” that will not only please your residents, but yourselves and those who evaluate your work.


LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


1. After the Storm: Healing a Traumatized Industry
Long-term care leaders are traumatized, fatigued, disillusioned and, in some cases, hopeless to recover from the COVID-19 Pandemic. With many seasoned leaders opting out of the next chapter of long-term care, valuable experiential knowledge and support is out of reach for a new generation of leaders. As we move forward in a post-pandemic world, appealing to new populations of staff and restoring consumer confidence will require a rethinking of what is person-centered, homelike, and rich in the potential for growth and recovery. This program will inspire a renewed energy and willingness to move ahead in those contemplating jumping ship. Moreover, this conversation will motivate a new leadership perspective, moving all leaders to be creative and tenacious in meeting the challenges of the emerging culture of long-term care.


2. Managing the Business of People
Staff recruitment and retention has emerged as a growing concern for many facilities. As the nation faces a significant nursing shortage, staff turnover, particularly at the management and supervisory levels, causes the facility to remain in a state of instability. Achieving an environment of care that speaks equally to the quality of life for residents and the quality of work life for staff requires education and training that goes beyond addressing what the resident needs. It’s time to begin asking what those working in the facility need.  This session offers practical guidance in developing an effective strategy for anticipating and addressing the organizational behaviors that challenge the facility’s ability to achieve its goals.


3. Improving Communication, Teamwork and Person-Centered Care
This discussion offers an overview of the culture change movement, the primary principles of this ideology, and how this national perspective impacts the expectations of regulators and consumers. This conversation explores the responsibilities and expectations for improvements in Behavioral Health and the development of person-centered interventions. Discussion will focus on the development of improved assessment and care planning processes, and interdisciplinary teamwork and communication.  The development of care relationships with community and contract providers to ensure a broad range of services are available to meet the medical and psychosocial needs of a rapidly changing resident population will also be discussed.


CUSTOMER SERVICE


1. Creating Livable Environments:  Customer Service in the 21st Century
This discussion offers an overview of the culture change movement, the primary principles of this ideology, and how this perspective impacts the expectations of regulators and contemporary consumers. Overcoming the present staffing challenges to create a caregiving environment that speaks equally to the quality of life for residents and the quality of work-life for staff requires an understanding of the human and emotional needs of everyone.  The nature of relationships and what makes a community attractive to potential residents is a central theme of this conversation. More importantly, we will discuss effecting true culture change:  not simply a project, but a positive and lasting change in the thinking and behavior of those who live and work in the environment.


2. Cultural Competency
As the long-term care community becomes more diverse, representing a variety of ethnic and cultural considerations, caregivers in nursing homes and assisted living facilities will need to ensure that care is provided in a manner that is appropriate to the culture and life experiences of the individual. This session explores the expectations for staff competency and skill in matters of effective assessment, communication and responsiveness to the culturally-based needs of residents.  This discussion will focus on developing a set of quality standards and practices that allow staff to effectively learn about and adopt care pathways for residents from different backgrounds and circumstances.


THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY


1. Discover the Power of Meaningful Activity
This interactive program is designed to provide caregivers, particularly those involved in designing and facilitating behavioral interventions, with ideas and strategies for satisfying the needs of a rapidly changing population. Developing a team approach to the provision of meaningful activity, integrating technology, recognizing the benefit of “life skills” programming, and recognizing the impact of positive activity interventions on challenging psychosocial behaviors are the focus of this discussion. The intent and objectives of the Federal regulations relative to Behavioral Health and the provision of meaningful and diversional activities will be reviewed in anticipation of compliance with Phase 3 of the Final Rule.


2. The Miracle of Technology
In an age when the mix of people served in long term care is increasingly diverse, meeting the needs of many takes on a new significance.  At every level of care, the population to be served is younger, more culturally and ethnically complex and impacted in great part by dementia and other cognitive or functional deficits that preclude traditional group activity participation.  Introducing technology in the form of computers, iPods and iPads, DVD players, smart phones and other means of providing an individual or small group experience will extend and expand the opportunities for truly person-centered planning.  This session provides information and examples of technology at work.


3. Therapeutic Recreation:  Meeting the Challenges of a New Generation

This interactive program is designed to provide caregivers, particularly those involved in designing and facilitating behavioral interventions, with ideas and strategies for satisfying the needs of a rapidly changing population.  Discussion is focused on developing a team approach to the provision of meaningful activity and the benefits of a well-coordinated, interdisciplinary program of activity designed to engage and divert, particularly in cases where challenging behaviors are being addressed.  Examples of current deficiency citations impacting Activities and review of the revised Federal regulations for Activities will be offered for consideration.


4. The Impact of Music on Memory and Language

Music affects the brain in ways that can promote language and understanding beyond the spoken word. Research also shows that music has a significant impact on reducing depression and agitation in people with dementia. This session offers strategies for identifying and applying musical interventions designed to support improved cognition, communication, mood, and behavior. Beyond sing-a-long programs, the right music applied correctly can serve as a primary intervention for addressing the behavioral health needs of residents diagnosed with dementia, mental disorders, or post-traumatic stress disorders.


5. Therapeutic Activity:  Activity Programming in Mental Health
Traditional activity programming often fails to meet the emotional and social needs of the growing numbers of residents with mental disorders, substance use, and intellectual disabilities. Therapeutic activity should be person-centered, productive, and designed to serve as a realistic foundation for recovery and improvement. This session offers guidance in developing new pathways to improved coordination and teamwork in the provision of therapeutic activity.


REGULATORY COMPLIANCE


1. Abuse Prevention: Strategies for Achieving Compliance and Quality
This session offers an in-depth look at the regulatory expectations for the prevention of abuse, neglect, and exploitation in long-term care.  The focus of this discussion is on recognizing the broad range of events and circumstances that constitute abuse, including those that may not rise to the level of a reportable abuse, but are offensive to the resident. The impact of the new CMS “Do Not Proceed” symbol on consumer perspectives on long-term care will also be discussed. Advice and resources on developing viable, efficient quality assurance systems for staff education and competency, reporting and investigation, and performance improvement.


2. Quality Assurance Performance Improvement (QAPI) A Recipe for Success

Too often, long term care facilities lose their way in sustaining the policies and systems they create to achieve their goals for quality care and regulatory compliance.  This session is designed to help you meet the CMS challenge to improve quality assurance and performance improvement practices by demystifying the process. 


FEDERALLY REQUIRED EDUCATION FOR ALL

NEW HIRES AND ANNUALLY FOR ALL STAFF


1. Communication and Interpersonal Skills
Discussion on the intent of the Federal regulations relative to ensuring that staff communicate effectively with residents and their families, and with members of the interdisciplinary team; and the expectations for policy development, staff education and training, and quality assurance monitoring.


2. F550 Residents’ Rights and Facility Responsibilities
Discussion on the Federal long-term care regulations relative to Residents’ Rights and Facility Responsibilities; and the expectations for policy development, staff education and training, and quality assurance monitoring.


3. F600 – F610 Freedom from Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation
Discussion on the Federal long-term care regulations relative to Resident Rights and The Prevention of Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation; and the expectations for policy development, staff education and training, and quality assurance monitoring.


4. F744 Care of Residents with Dementia
Discussion on the Federal long-term care regulations relative to the care of a resident who displays or is diagnosed with dementia; and the expectations for policy development, staff education and training, and quality assurance monitoring.


5. F865 Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (QAPI)
Discussion on the Federal long-term care regulations relative to the Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (QAPI) program; and the expectations for policy development and staff education and training.


6. F880 Infection Control
Discussion on the Federal long-term care regulations relative to Infection Control; and the expectations for policy development, staff education and training, and quality assurance monitoring.


7. F895 Compliance and Ethics
Discussion on the Federal long-term care regulations relative to the facility’s Compliance and Ethics Program; and the expectations for policy development, staff education and training, and quality assurance monitoring.


8. F740-F744 Behavioral Health
Discussion on the Federal long-term care regulations relative to Behavioral Health; and the expectations for policy development and staff education and training.



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